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20100101
20100131
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
washington post." the year has been highlighted by a number of domestic and foreign policy challenges. it also tonight, comedy legend bob newhart, celebrating 50 years in show business, including one of tv's true classics, "the bob newhart show." a look at president obama's first year and office -- a look at president obama's first year in office and bob newhart, coming up right now. i>> there are so many things tht walmart is looking forward to doing, like helping people live better. but mostly, we're helping build stronger communities and relationships. because with your help, the best is yet to come. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports "tavis smiley." tavis and nationwide, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: dan balz has been covering politics for the boston post more than 30 years now -- for the washington post more than 30 years now. dan, nice to have
could redeem this if we ret in washington and on wall street. >> i want to be presumptions and add one more st.. pennsylvania avenue. wall street, your street, and pennsylvania avenue. i was at your conference in washington were you were talking about ending poverty. you dedicate the majority of your life to eradicating poverty. it can be done. you have a plan. others have laid out plans about how we end poverty. this president has not gotten serious about ending poverty. this wall street stock -- he did that. he said the other day, they get it now. jobs, jobs, jobs, but how do we rediscover our values when the people in washington have not -- i do not want to say figure it out. it is more about making a priority to end poverty. it can be done. >> i have known him for 10 years, and when he was elected, he said, to accomplish anything important, i will need the wind of movement at my back. i said, probably one at your front. fdr needed the labor movement, so it has not yet become a social movement. i was on pennsylvania avenue before christmas with some first-time home buyers. they save
"american sketches." he joins us tonight from washington. good to have you back on the program. >> and good to be back with you. tavis: let me start by asking whether or not to your mind there were any immediate comparisons, or not so immediate comparisons, that you drew between what we in toward with hurricane katrina in new orleans and what we are seeing in haiti as we speak. >> let me start with a good things. there is something about the human heart that has benevolence, compassion. when something is happening to someone else that is bad, people want to help. people are still coming into new orleans to help. that was the same instinct in haiti. the darker side of it, in new orleans whether it was that the state level, the national level, or the local level, like you did not have great governance. you do not have people working together efficiently in the government. likewise we have that problem in haiti. we talk about leadership i lot. both of those situations prove that good leadership matters. tavis: it does matter, but as good leadership matter only during a crisis? or before you ge
of bt sells. including "america sketches." heoins us tonight from washington good t have you ba on the program. >> and gooto be back wh you. tas: let me start b asking whher or n to yourind the were any immedte compasons, or not so immediate comparisons, that you drew between what we in towd with hurricane katrinan new orleans and ate are seeing in haiti as we speak. >> let me start with a good ings. there isomething about the human heart that has benevolence, compassion. when somhing is happening to somne else thatis bad, pople want to help peoplare still coming into new orlns to help. that was the same instinct in iti. the darker side of itin new orleans whether it was that the state level, the national lvel, or the loc vel, like you did not have great governance. you do not hav people worki togher efficiently in the vernment. likewise we have tt oblem in haiti. we talk about leadship i lot. bothof those situations prove that good leadership mters. tas: it does mter, but as good learship matter only during a isis? or before you get in? there culd heeen better leadershipon ever
sector. the areas have so much power in washington thathe only force a prident has and obama has itore than anyon else is the power to draw on public vigor. tavis: but if the white house that is to s the people around him, maybe eve the president himself, if the view those who are pushing him holding him accountable out of respe because we want toee him succeed in the white house, if they takthat asushback rather than a move to push them forward, thais to say, if they take whatou and others are doing, what i mighbe saying as an attack against th, then how doe become the wind at their backs, so to speak? >> well, i think it's a question how we voice our desires and hopes and dreams. it's a questn of barack obama's mpemembering all of the enmously inspiring etoric and ideas. it wasn't st rhetoric that he shared with the public. the public in this cntry didn elect barack obamao go and shake hands andake nice-nice with his adversaes. they didt do that. he wasn't elected by 80% of the public. he w elected by half of e publ who thought, i thi quite rightly, that had what gone on for the last
to talk about, if only we'd it beyond the partisan ambitions of constructing washington that do not matter so much in our everyday lives. tavis: in the book to make a strong case for linking reform in the market system with redefining democracy. how would that work, redefining democracy? >> in many ways we do not live in a democracy, we live in a system where we complain and kick out the people we do not like that have yet to disappoint us. ancient athens, the birthplace of democracy, it had its problems, but what was interesting about democracy there was the fact that there were no elections. at the beginning of every year 6000 people were chosen at random to run the city. at the end of the year they disbanded and another lottery was set up. of course, the pale vestige of that is our jury system. but it is clear that there is something between the jury system and that -- direct democracy across the united states that the work. we have seen that, particularly around food in the united states. one out of six americans went hungry in 2008. appallingly high numbers. a rash of things spreading
, that you don't think personally as the chief washington correspondent for the new york timesyou don't feel that he spent oo little time on the enomy, but ttoesn't - that doesn'tquare well with the lls and surveys'm reading about whathe american people think,avid. >> that'right. the's also a difference between the amount of time tha as reporte we see a president focus something and the perction about what he i taing. . d i think that my whore -- who watch the president could, think, make a legitimate case that he prably didn't spd enough time talking about the issuthat americans ce about the most, which ijob creation. and now washat? becae he decided to devote that time health care a he made the argument, whether you believe it or you don't, that if he dn't get the health care costs under contro it was goin to have a affect the rest of the domestic economy. having made that -- >> but how good a job did they do, david, connectin those things becau here again i don't thinthe average american s heard or understood yet from this white house respectfuy, the direct link that the white house th
page of the "washington post"." i began to understand how important books are in the lives of others. i knew how important it was in my own life but i didn't recognize how important a book is to someone else, some random person comes in and says this is a great book. read this. they come back to me and say you were right. what else? i'm really forever grateful to this man because again, a lot of doors have been closed in my face but he opened up the first door and that has paved the way for everything else. tavis: you get the job in the bookstore and make the most and go to college and graduate with honors and give the commencement when you graduate. >> that was -- i shared the stage with the director of the c.i.a. tavis: how funny is that? >> the irony of all ironies. i'm sitting here at maryland university and get the opportunity to address 16,000 people on the importance of education. it was nearly 12 years to the date of me being sentenced by the judge. it was nearly 12 years to the date of me addressing the judge and it was a tremendous honor because the judge they told me thought
you suggest, just a few moments ago, that you don't think personally as the chief washington correspondent for the new york times, you don't feel that he spent too little time on the economy, but that doesn't -- that doesn't square well with the polls and surveys i'm reading about what the american people think, david. >> that's right. there's also a difference between the amount of time that, as reporters we see a president focus on something and the perception about what he is talking. . and i think that many who are -- who watch the president could, i think, make a legitimate case that he probably didn't spend enough time talking about the issue that americans care about the most, which is job creation. and now was that? because he decided to devote that time to health care and he made the argument, whether you believe it or you don't, that if he didn't get the health care costs under control, it was going to have an affect on the rest of the domestic economy. having made that -- >> but how good a job did they do, david, connecting those things because here again i n't thi
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)